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The Conversation appoints Indigenous and Multimedia editors

23 Mar 2021

The Conversation staff and donors attending a news conference in 2019.

Behind the scenes The Conversation is powered by a small team of 25 editors who work with academic authors to bring their research and analysis to you.

We’re pleased to welcome two new members to our team who will increase our capacity to cover key areas and improve the way we present our articles.

Chynthia Wijaya – Deputy Editor, Multimedia

Chynthia Wijaya has been appointed Deputy Editor, Multimedia. Her role will involve producing multimedia content such as graphs, video and audio than can help experts communicate their ideas clearly.

Cynthia previously worked in video production and editing, freelancing for Vice Australia and the Museum of Chinese Australian History. She has a Masters degree in Global Media Communications from Melbourne University and is an experienced video producer.

Her first job will be to work with our Multimedia Editor Wes Mountain and Social Storytelling Editor Tessa Ogle to strengthen our video presence on Instagram and Tik Tok.

In her first three weeks in the job, she has already produced some stunning and informative new videos for The Conversation’s IGTV channel.

Carissa Lee – Commissioning Editor, Indigenous & Public Policy

Carissa Lee has been appointed Commissioning Editor, Indigenous & Public Policy. Her role will involve commissioning, editing and publishing articles that draw on academic expertise to inform public understanding of issues that impact the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This will include expanding our network of Indigenous authors.

Carissa is a Noongar writer, editor and actor, born on Wemba-Wemba country, based in Narrm (Melbourne).

She is the First Peoples and Public Policy Specialist Editor at the Analysis and Policy Observatory (read her work here).

She is currently completing her PhD at the University of Melbourne in Indigenous arts and cultures. Her dissertation is about cross-cultural collaborations in First Nations theatre.

She has previously written for The Conversation as an academic expert in Indigenous performing arts, discussing how to shed the victim narrative in on-screen representations of Aboriginal people.

She is also an accomplished actor, working across film, televison and theatre.

We can’t wait to work with Chynthia and Carissa to improve The Conversation’s visual storytelling and our coverage of Indigenous affairs. ??????


Read the full article here.
This content was originally published by The Conversation. Original publishers retain all rights. It appears here for a limited time before automated archiving.By The Conversation

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